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Wideman Comparative Glossary of Common Project Management Terms v3.1 is copyright by R. Max Wideman, March 2002.

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Locate Responsibility - to - Lump Sum

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Term
Definition     Editor's Choice
 
Source
Locate Responsibility
The act of determining who is responsible for a particular activity or event. [D02966]

 RMW
Location
A position or site occupied or available for occupancy or marked by some distinguishing feature. [D02967]

 Webster
LOE
See Level of Effort

  
Logic
See Network Logic. [D00949]

  
The interdependency of the activities in a network. [D00950]

 PMK87
Logic Diagram
See Project Network Diagram. [D00951]

  
Logic Link
See Dependency Links. [D00952]

  
Logic Loop
A circular sequence of dependency links between activities in a network. [D00953]

 WST
Logic Network
Diagram showing dependencies between activities. [D00954]

 NPMT
Logic Restraint
A dummy which defines the dependency of one part of the network on another part of it. [D00955]

 CPMUSC 176-8
Logic Sequencing
The arranging of project activities in to a self-evident or reasoned and progressive series. [D02968]

 RMW
Logical Relationship
A dependency between two project activities or between a project activity and a milestone.
Editor's Note: The dependency may include a lead or a lag, which may be negative in value, reflecting a Fast Track approach. [D00957]

 WST
A dependency between two project activities, or between a project activity and a milestone. See also precedence relationship. The four possible types of logical relationships are: [D00956]

 PMK96
Logical View
An architectural view that describes the main classes in the design of the system: major business-related classes, and the classes that define key behavioral and structural mechanisms (persistency, communications, fault-tolerance, user-interface). In the Unified Process, the logical view is a view of the design model. [D04855]

 RUP
Logistics
Services and supplies necessary to the deployment and support of a system. [D04131]

 CSM
The business of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of resources to accomplish a particular task. [D03644]

 RMW
Logistics Support
Services provided to deploy, operate, and maintain systems. Typical services include transportation, maintenance, supply, training, spares, data management, operations and maintenance personnel, computer resources, packaging and handling, interface management, and support equipment. [D04132]

 CSM
The supply and maintenance of material essential to proper operation of a system in the field. [D02969]

 PMDT
Long Lead Items
Those components of a system or piece of equipment for which the times to design and fabricate are the longest and for which an early commitment of funds may be desirable or necessary in order to meet the earliest possible date of system completion. [D03645]

 DSMC
Long Lead Procurement
The early procurement of material or parts to accommodate early use or long procurement spans. Contractors may choose to seek buyer-approved pre-award commitments of funds to meet the long lead requirements. [D04133]

 CSM
Long-Term
Anything occurring over or involving a relatively long period of time.
Editor's Note: Generally thought of as several years. [D02970]

 Webster
Loop
A path in a network closed on itself passing through any node more than once on any given path. The network cannot be analyzed, as it is not a logical network. [D00960]

 PMK87
A network path that passes the same node twice. Loops cannot be analyzed using traditional network analysis techniques such as CPM and PERT. Loops are allowed in GERT [D00958]

 PMK96
In networks, a set of symbols indicating that one or more activities are mutually dependent. [D00959]

 WST
An error in a network which results in a later activity imposing a logical restraint on an earlier activity. [D04585]

 APM
BS
Loss
A situation that exists when cost is greater than revenue (e.g., contract price). Profit is negative. [D03528]

 GAT
Lot
A collection of units of product bearing identification and treated as a unique entity from which a sample is to be drawn and inspected to determine conformance with the acceptability criteria. [D00961]

 MIL-STD 105
QMPP
Lot Formation
The procedure of collecting, segregating, or delineating production units into homogeneous identifiable groups according to type, grade, class, size, composition, or condition of manufacture. [D00962]

 MIL-STD 109A
QMPP
Lot Size
The number of units of product in a lot. [D00963]

 MIL-STD 105
QMPP
Lowest Management Level ("LML")
A term used in the Dynamic Baseline Model hierarchy in which a project may be positioned and is the control point for a project. It represents the level at which the project must be managed on an on-going basis in order to deal effectively with the dynamic issues below the LSB.
  1. For a "Production" project the LML is the Supervisor level. A Supervisor is the lowest management level with sufficient capacity and authority to deal effectively with a dynamic procedures baseline.
  2. For a "Construction" project the LML is the Manager level. A Manager is the lowest management level with sufficient capacity and authority to deal effectively with a dynamic design baseline.
  3. For a "Development" project the LML is the Director level. A Director is the lowest management level with sufficient capacity and authority to deal effectively with a dynamic requirements baseline.
  4. For an "Evolution" project the LML is the Owner level. The project Owner is the lowest management level with sufficient capacity and authority to deal effectively with a dynamic objectives baseline.
A project can only be expected to meet its LSB, and therefore success or failure should only realistically be measured relative to that baseline. [D04376]

 33
Lowest Static Baseline ("LSB")
Using the flow down of organizational objectives from corporate values to project objectives to functional requirements to product design, the LSB is the lowest level that is relatively fixed for a given project in the hierarchy and is therefore readily "baseline-able". A term used in the Dynamic Baseline Model hierarchy in which a project may be positioned. A project can only be expected to meet its LSB, and therefore success or failure should only realistically be measured relative to that baseline. [D04370]

 33
LQ
See Limiting Quality

  
LS
See Late Start

  
LSB
See Lowest Static Baseline

  
LSD
See Late Start Date

  
Lump Sum
See Fixed Price. [D02971]

  
Definitions for page L03: 36


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