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Table of Figures

Figure Title Page #
2-1
The pie making project
13
3-1
Project management integration the source of success
25
3-2
The complete project life span generic model
30
3-3
Work as an integrator
39
5-1
The PLS phase deliverables and executive control points
49
5-2
The PLS hierarchy
50
5-3
The fractal nature of project management
52
5-4
Sea shell showing fractal geometry
52
5-5
PLS activities by phase typical
53
5-6
PLS activities by phase construction
54
5-7
PLS activities by phase mfg. & distribution engineering
55
5-8
PLS activities by phase new product intro. or info. tech. products
56
5-9
PLS activities by phase systems development
57
5-10
Typical project bar chart construction
58
5-11
Typical project bar chart information systems
58
5-12
Typical project bar chart defense systems acquisition
59
5-13
Typical PLS profile level of effort
60
5-14
Typical PLS profile the "S" curve
61
5-15
Typical PLS profile potential for adding value
61
5-16
Typical PLS profile escalating cost to change or fix
62
5-17
Typical PLS profile adding value versus cost to change
63
5-18
Typical PLS profile opportunity versus amount at stake
64
5-19
Typical PLS profile the information explosion
65
5-20
A project system is part of a larger one
65
5-21
Relationships with other life spans
66
5-22
Fish's "Vee" model of the project life span
67
5-23
Simplified software development flow chart
69
5-24
The PLS superimposed on the software development flow chart
70
6-1
Scope of a project management body of knowledge
76
7-1
Construction project management in a corporate environment
84
7-2
The function-process-time relationship (1983)
85
7-3
Project management body of knowledge setting
87
7-4
Kerzner's cover jacket
88
7-5
A three dimensional matrix
88
7-6
Project management matrix model
89
7-7
Stretton's suitcase of project manager's tools and techniques
90
7-8
Allen's Project Management Classification Structure
92
7-9
IPMA's sun wheel
93
7-10
Wideman's concept map of project management
95
7-11
The "orthogonal" model of project management
96
7-12
Crawford's mapping of "project manager role units" (circa 2003)
98
7-13
Microsoft's quality angle
99
7-14
Davis's project management tetrahedron
99
8-1
Marasco's project pyramid model
105
8-2
Project outcomes related to the standard probability bell curve
106
8-3
Lognormal distribution of positive outcomes only
106
8-4
The Project Management Institute's view of a project
109
8-5
Relation between scope, quality and cost
110
8-6
Relation between resources, time and cost
110
8-7
Matching project inputs to project outputs
111
8-8
Matching input to output to arrive at Marasco's pyramid base
111
8-9
Consequent risk of poor project quality
114
8-10
The bathtub effect in the life of a project
114
8-11
Wideman's complete model of project parameters
116
8-12
Pyramid volume as a function of team quality & project difficulty
117
9-1
The market's view of project management
127
9-2
The tetrad trade off emphasis varies with the type of project and often with the project phase
128
10-1
Keeping on track
134
10-2
Tracking and steering a project
135
10-3
Traditional management feedback
136
10-4
The project control cycle
138
10-5
Project control in practice
139
10-6
"S" curves a powerful management control tool
140
10-7
The function-process-time relationship in project management
144
11-1
The project portfolio environment
148
11-2
The project environment as a process
150
11-3
Environmental influences on the project
151
11-4
Concept of an inverted organization chart
152
11-5
Managing the environment the public relations concept
155
13-1
Project selection by screening
169
13-2
Chart showing format for ranking of projects
171
14-1
Different project portfolios have different costs and values
181
14-2
The best project portfolios define the efficient frontier
182
14-3
Project portfolio enhanced by applying the efficient frontier
183
14-4
Five levels of project portfolio management
185
15-1
The success target
191
15-2
Summary of principle success criteria
195
15-3
Project success varies with time
196
16-1
Basic 2x2 project classification
205
16-2
Basic project or major component classification
206
A-1
Conceptual institution project management mission
210
A-2
Idealized progressive project management learning
211
A-3
Hierarchical structure of functional knowledge
213
A-4
Levels of project management learning
215

 
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